Outdoor Tsniout

Outdoor Tsniout

The Torah asks the Jewish people to act differently from other nations (peoples) of the world. Each of our acts must be reflected, codified by the divine law, and that also passes by the dress code. Because of its great sanctity, a Jew can not afford to publicly reveal a part of his body that should remain covered. Thus, a man can not walk in shorts, or his head uncovered. This is contrary to the laws of tsnihut. Similarly, a woman should cover her arms to the elbows, and wear skirts that go down at least to the knees. The clothes should not be too tight, and the married Jewish woman will cover her hair. Colors that catch the eye, such as red, and too much makeup are also prohibited. On the other hand, neglecting its external appearance is just as forbidden. Thus, it is forbidden to show oneself with a stained or torn coat. It would show a lack of respect for the body that God has given us. But we must not see in his laws any attack on the freedom to dress as we see fit. On the contrary, tsniut preserves the image that the Jewish people must convey, an image neither provocative nor flashy. For women, everything related to beauty, makeup, hairdressing, body care, well-being ... are completely allowed. Adopting a tsniout outfit is not synonymous with neglect and does not mean wearing dark colors every day. Inner Tsniut People mistakenly think that tsniut is a set of dress rules. It is not so. For what good to wear clothes respecting all the codes of the Jewish law, if it is to speak vulgarly, or to adopt a pretentious behavior, proud and vain? Thus, the language also has its codes of the tsniut. The tone must be laid, and each word chosen with care. Grossness, of course, has nothing to do in the mouth of a Jew, and it will be easily understood that the Lachon ara-the gossip is persona non grata. The relationship to others, the approach, the way of life, all these elements are also concerned by tsniut. All this, unlike clothing, left to the personal appreciation of each. You have understood, the tsniut is a way of life, a way of being, in a society where alone dominates the appearance. Tsniout is not opposed to elegance and well-dress, on the contrary, the important thing is not to confuse the essential and the accessory